Emotional – Moor Plastic Surgery http://moorplasticsurgery.com/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 23:05:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://moorplasticsurgery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/cropped-icon-32x32.png Emotional – Moor Plastic Surgery http://moorplasticsurgery.com/ 32 32 Virginia Public School Enrollments Fail to Rebound From Pre-Pandemic Levels | Richmond Local News https://moorplasticsurgery.com/virginia-public-school-enrollments-fail-to-rebound-from-pre-pandemic-levels-richmond-local-news/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://moorplasticsurgery.com/virginia-public-school-enrollments-fail-to-rebound-from-pre-pandemic-levels-richmond-local-news/ “I think it’s important to point out that a good percentage of the drop in enrollment is in the early years,” said Jon Becker, associate professor of educational leadership at Virginia Commonwealth University. “There are a lot of possible explanations for declining enrollment. It’s not just parents angry with public schools over how they handled […]]]>

“I think it’s important to point out that a good percentage of the drop in enrollment is in the early years,” said Jon Becker, associate professor of educational leadership at Virginia Commonwealth University. “There are a lot of possible explanations for declining enrollment. It’s not just parents angry with public schools over how they handled schooling during the pandemic.”

In the Richmond area, Chesterfield and Hanover rebounded from registrations ahead of the pandemic. Chesterfield, which lost nearly 2,000 students in the 2020 school year, the year in which all school systems in the region except Hanover virtually started, has seen an increase of 2,000 students .

Hanover County, which lost around 1,000 students at the start of the pandemic, has seen an increase of about 300 students this year, from 16,519 students in 2020-2021 to 16,865 students this school year. In the 2019-2020 school year, the district had more than 17,000 students, according to state data. Hanover was the only school district in the Richmond area to have an in-person school five days a week at the start of the 2021 school year.

The figures for Richmond public schools are largely unclear. On paper, it appears that 7,000 students have left RPS, increasing the number of students from 28,000 to 21,000. But, the vast majority of that drop, Superintendent Jason Kamras said, is likely due to the severing of ties with Virginia Virtual Academy, a virtual school operated by K-12, for which RPS served as the tax agent. The Virginia Virtual Academy is not the same as Virtual Virginia, a program run by the state Department of Education.


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The toxic phrase we have to stop saying this time of year https://moorplasticsurgery.com/the-toxic-phrase-we-have-to-stop-saying-this-time-of-year/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 05:00:01 +0000 https://moorplasticsurgery.com/the-toxic-phrase-we-have-to-stop-saying-this-time-of-year/ Barely 12 hours after the last trick of Halloween and my sweet kids were put to bed, I started my typical Monday morning fitness class. But mid-board, the instructor’s commentary caught me off guard and didn’t go over well with me the rest of the day. “Let’s work all that Halloween candy!” She cried into […]]]>

Barely 12 hours after the last trick of Halloween and my sweet kids were put to bed, I started my typical Monday morning fitness class. But mid-board, the instructor’s commentary caught me off guard and didn’t go over well with me the rest of the day.

“Let’s work all that Halloween candy!” She cried into her microphone.

The nonchalant phrase of “let’s work ___”, while surely meant to be a light joke, is seriously problematic, experts say. The idea that you need to exercise more than food or earn treats isn’t just prevalent during Halloween – it’s extremely common to hear during the holiday season as well.

Here’s why this mentality needs to end and how you can feel good about your body instead:

It discredits the most important benefits of exercise

I definitely wasn’t at the gym that morning to burn the candy. I was there to strengthen my postpartum abs, visit friends, and move my body to feel flexible and strong.

Boston-based nutritionist Emmie Keefe said that whenever instructors focused on that calorie-based “motivation” it backfired.

“We should never exercise to burn calories.… We should exercise for cardiovascular health, for mental health, for emotional health. It structures your day. You can socialize by through classes together, ”she explained.“ There is so many reasons to exercise. Bburning calories shouldn’t be one of them.

Recent research shows that focusing on regular exercise improves your longevity – even more than focusing on weight loss. Exercise also eases symptoms of anxiety and depression, improves creativity, and helps you sleep better. Meanwhile, viewing exercise as a punishment rather than a beneficial activity makes you less likely to behave in a healthy way.

Keefe added that the “mental gymnastics” of trying to count the calories in and out with food and exercise is not always realistic or helpful. Instead, regular exercise can help you feel more motivated in other areas of your life and start the day productively.

What this walk and this workout won’t do is burn off what you ate right before, ”she said. “This way of thinking is a big, big deal.”

“There are so many reasons to play sports. Burning calories shouldn’t be one of them.

– Emmie Keefe

It promotes harmful food mindsets

How do you feel when you’re about to eat a pumpkin pie or Christmas pudding that you only encounter once or twice a year? Hope just excited, and nothing else. According to Alyssa Royse, owner of Rocket Fitness Community in Seattle, the mindset that you have to earn that pie or repair the damage is “really dangerous.”

“It connects us to this idea that we have to earn the right to eat and earn the right to have fun. These two things are innate in the simple fact of having a body … of being alive, you are allowed to [both],” she said.

“When we moralize food, we trigger all kinds of dangerous thoughts and behaviors in people,” she continued. This includes eating disorders, which can lead to major long-term health complications such as heart damage, problems with hair growth, brain damage, lethargy, etc.

Instead of making these negative connections, the trainers at her gym don’t mention food. If Christmas is approaching, they try to focus on positive aspects such as “Go have fun and enjoy the bounty, go and feel the joy… this is the main purpose of your body – to experience the joy”, he said. Royse said.

Royse added that people already have these damaging thoughts themselves around the holiday season, following years of toxic media posts where people are being pushed to be slimmer. She encourages her clients to question those connections they and others have made and move towards body and food neutrality instead.

“Food doesn’t have to be an emotional or moral experience. You are allowed to have it, ”she said.

Keefe also noted that shaming yourself for what you’ve eaten can have additional physical consequences. Due to the stress hormones you release through this thought pattern, you may experience stomach pain and digestive issues (along with many other issues like headaches, heart palpitations, and more).

“You really hurt yourself twice,” she said. Instead, she emphasizes enjoying it and moving on.

“Food doesn’t have to be an emotional or moral experience. You are allowed to have it.

– Alyssa Royse

Listen to your body instead

Both experts believe it is necessary to tune in to your body instead of letting outside forces influence how you feel, especially when it comes to the holiday season. This process, also known as mindful eating, involves paying close attention to your food – mentally noticing its taste and the pleasure of eating it. It also makes you listen to your natural hunger and fullness signals. Food is not something you ‘deserve’ and there is absolutely no expectation that you will need to ‘get rid of it’.

Royse said she was specifically trying to drink more water (one drink per party cocktail) and take more walks, not as a punishment but as a way to counter any physical discomfort she may be feeling.

Keefe loves all the party foods she wants, while prioritizing nutrition. She chooses fruits and vegetables when she can, noting that this time of year doesn’t necessarily mean you should only eat rich foods or stick to just the veggie platter. She has also seen clients make themselves ill by trying to preventively compensate for the physical impact.

“They burn out exercising in anticipation or in response to the way they ate on vacation. Their general health is deteriorating… their bodies are under tremendous stress, ”she said. “Treat your body with kindness. “


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Halcyon member Euphoria.LGBT brings fintech to gender transition process https://moorplasticsurgery.com/halcyon-member-euphoria-lgbt-brings-fintech-to-gender-transition-process/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 14:55:25 +0000 https://moorplasticsurgery.com/halcyon-member-euphoria-lgbt-brings-fintech-to-gender-transition-process/ As technology becomes more socially conscious, many companies can say that they are working on something for the greater good. But few can say that they support the soul of the users. Euphoria.LGBT, member of the DC Social Impact Incubator Alcyon, is a startup with a plethora of apps dedicated to “helping the trans soul” […]]]>

As technology becomes more socially conscious, many companies can say that they are working on something for the greater good. But few can say that they support the soul of the users.

Euphoria.LGBT, member of the DC Social Impact Incubator Alcyon, is a startup with a plethora of apps dedicated to “helping the trans soul” in the words of the founder and CEO Catherine Antoine. Last week, the company launched happiness, a banking app for the trans community. This is one of many intended to help users with the transition – the process of undergoing changes in presentation or gender characteristics to match internal gender identity.

“We’re creating all of these different technologies that address a specific pain point of gender transition and try to do it in a way that really asserts the user and restores dignity and agency,” Anthony told Technical. ly.

After raising $ 500,000 in a pre-seed round, Euphoria.LGBT, founded in April 2019, launched three apps this year alongside Comfort, its inaugural app that offers a resource guide for gender transition.

Before Bliss, it had already launched in 2021 Windfall, a marketplace for the work of trans artists; Clarity, where users can compare gender expression and gender identity; and Devotion, which offers daily affirmations. Catharsis, a mental and emotional health platform, is also set to launch in the New Year. The company is also expected to launch a startup cycle in the coming weeks to help expand its team and update existing applications.

Catherine Antoine. (Courtesy photo)

Bliss, which launched last week, is the fifth app under the Euphoria umbrella. Available in the iOS App Store and the Google Play Store, it’s a fintech tool that helps transgender users manage their money. Users do not need to go through strict identity verification steps which can make logins difficult. Such a scenario could occur when users have ID cards and papers that do not match their preferred pronouns.

Anthony said that from the intro screen, the app is specially designed for those going through the transition process.

Users can add specific financial goals related to the transition, such as when they can afford hormone therapy or a driver’s license update, etc. (Euphoria estimates the average cost of the transition to be $ 150,000 per person). Bliss, which is built in conjunction with the banking platform Jiko, also automatically invests user funds in government guaranteed treasury bills for additional financial security and potential gain.

This is in addition to measuring savings and noting progress, which can help reduce stress. Anthony also noted that Bliss offers a predictive edge: it can determine a specific end date for the transition based on funding, instead of leaving it hanging.

“It seems like our best possible tool to help people realize themselves faster,” said Anthony. “We know that the sooner we can help people do this, there will be more trans people to walk on this Earth because they are going to survive.”

But Euphoria’s real goal, said Anthony, is that one day its technology will become obsolete and unnecessary.

“We want a day when our technology doesn’t have to exist,” said Anthony. “Whether it’s because the world has become tolerant enough that we don’t need these specialized technologies, whether it’s because information is becoming so ubiquitous that it doesn’t make sense that there is an application. , or even with banking services that there’s just been a day when people can just open an account for exactly who they are for and something like Bliss isn’t needed.

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The government increases accessibility to volunteering https://moorplasticsurgery.com/the-government-increases-accessibility-to-volunteering/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 00:20:54 +0000 https://moorplasticsurgery.com/the-government-increases-accessibility-to-volunteering/ Funding to improve access to volunteering through more opportunities, better allocation of training and resources Minister of Civil Society considers fund an “important step” to ensure equal access for all The government has launched a £ 7million fund with the Arts Council England, the Pears Foundation and the NHS Charities Together to help people access […]]]>
  • Funding to improve access to volunteering through more opportunities, better allocation of training and resources
  • Minister of Civil Society considers fund an “important step” to ensure equal access for all

The government has launched a £ 7million fund with the Arts Council England, the Pears Foundation and the NHS Charities Together to help people access more volunteering opportunities in various sectors including the arts and sport , Civil Society Minister Nigel Huddleston announced today.

The Volunteering Futures Fund, which includes nearly £ 6million from government direct and £ 1.15million from the Pears Foundation and the NHS Charities Together, will provide opportunities for a wide range of people, recognizing that it There are people across the country facing barriers to volunteering. The fund will put a strong emphasis on young people, isolated people, people with disabilities and people from ethnic minorities.

Organizations that carry out projects in the arts, heritage, museums, libraries, sport, civil society and youth sectors are encouraged to apply. These include nationwide projects to create internships for young people, in addition to more regional and local projects, such as those that work with a particular football club to provide volunteering opportunities.

Arts Council England will distribute £ 4.7million from the fund provided by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and today launched its Expressions of Interest competition, welcoming bids from £ 100,001 or more, for organizations to fund the training and support needed to carry out high quality volunteer projects.

In addition to the £ 4.7million in grants that ACE will administer, DCMS has awarded the Pears Foundation and NHS charities a sum of £ 1.15million. The two backers also add to the total themselves with an additional £ 1.15million, bringing the combined fund to £ 7million.

Civil Society Minister Nigel Huddleston said:

Making volunteering opportunities accessible to all is an important step towards leveling this country.

There are so many benefits to volunteering, such as improving mental health, learning new skills, and integrating into a community.

I urge organizations to apply for grants through Arts Council England, to develop and provide high quality volunteering opportunities.

The Department of Digital, Cultural, Media and Sports Sectors relies heavily on the hard work and dedication of volunteers to provide essential services in the youth, charity, sports and arts sectors. Volunteering also has undeniable benefits, including the acquisition of new skills, improved mental well-being and opportunities to connect with new people and join social networks, while contributing to society.

Sir Nicholas Serota, Chairman of Arts Council England, said:

Volunteers are at the heart of the cultural sector and help make possible many creative and cultural events enjoyed by people across the country. We know that volunteering can have huge physical, mental and emotional health benefits as well, and so we are excited to work with DCMS to administer this fund, and help spread the benefits of volunteering further to people from all walks of life. , in all regions of the country.

Ellie Orton OBE, Executive Director of NHS Charities Together, said:

Volunteering is the lifeblood of our communities and it also has very important personal benefits, from meeting new people to improving your mental health. This fund provides a much needed boost to help young people of all backgrounds access life-changing volunteering opportunities, and we are thrilled to be a part of it.

We support a network of 240 NHS charities across the UK – many of which have unparalleled expertise in delivering youth volunteering programs – and we look forward to working with them to channel these funds where they are most needed and can have the greatest impact. This includes increased support for our NHS workforce, as they face the most difficult winter in its history.

Sir Trevor Pears CMG, Executive Chairman of the Pears Foundation, said:

For so many civil society organizations, volunteers are the backbone of their work; the extraordinary response of volunteers to Covid-19 only underscored this. Now, as we look to the future, it is crucial that we help these organizations capitalize on this response, remove remaining barriers to recruitment, and further develop the infrastructure to support and invest in their volunteers.

We are delighted to partner again with DCMS to support some of our long-term partners in this work, carrying out projects aimed at developing volunteer opportunities for and benefiting people with disabilities and young people.

Following expressions of interest, Arts Council England will award grants by the end of March 2022, marking the start of two years of activity.

ENDS


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‘Morning Show’ EP on Season 2 finale, teases Season 3 time jump, plus Bradley and Laura – Deadline https://moorplasticsurgery.com/morning-show-ep-on-season-2-finale-teases-season-3-time-jump-plus-bradley-and-laura-deadline/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 22:18:00 +0000 https://moorplasticsurgery.com/morning-show-ep-on-season-2-finale-teases-season-3-time-jump-plus-bradley-and-laura-deadline/ Warning: the following interview contains spoilers on The morning show final episode of season 2 “Fever” AppleTV + Season 1 The morning show arguably ended with Covid, just like Season 2. Jennifer Aniston anchor Alex Levy literally goes on the air as she battles the virus, in what is a cathartic monologue ahead of her […]]]>

Warning: the following interview contains spoilers on The morning show final episode of season 2 “Fever”

AppleTV + Season 1 The morning show arguably ended with Covid, just like Season 2. Jennifer Aniston anchor Alex Levy literally goes on the air as she battles the virus, in what is a cathartic monologue ahead of her hearing at the sequel to her “cancellation” following Maggie Brenner’s revealing book about the host’s affair with her morning show co-host Mitch Kessler.

“The morning show”
Apple TV +

If you remember the season one finale, which fell on December 20, 2019, The morning show EP Kerry Ehrin was pretty prescient about the Covid invasion as Reese Witherspoon’s Bradley Jackson reports a cruise ship bound for Papua New Guinea that is delayed in port for four days in quarantine, carrying 5,000 passengers. Season 2 of The morning show until mid-March, as the world goes on lockdown and UBA executives discuss how to work remotely, something Alex’s dedicated producer Chip Black (Mark Duplass) has already gotten. .

“Fever” doesn’t leave us with big cliffhangers until Season 3, and Ehrin tells us why. She could have easily left us hanging at the end of Episode 9 when we first learn that after Alex’s cancellation, she has Covid. A big pivot tonight is that UBA boss Cory Ellison (Billy Crudup) expresses his deepest love to Bradley; this after her lover, Laura Peterson (Julianna Margulies) offers to move to Montana to live with her, leaving behind her life as a television host.

An interesting dangler is Paola (Valeria Golino), the lover of Mitch’s documentary filmmaker, with the latest confessional footage from the infamous presenter. She crashes into Cory’s office and immediately grabs his attention, the executive telling her that the pictures are a “living monument to mankind’s ability to do good,” praise and insight for a season that examined the cancellation of culture and whether or not the mass media can reverse it, for better or for worse.

Here is our conversation with Ehrin. Note that Apple has yet to announce a revival of Season 3 of The morning show.

I once heard Jenji Kohan say in an interview for Weeds, that its last episode of a season serves as the first episode of the following season, while the penultimate episode is really the finale of the current season. With the audience learning of Alex’s COVID at the end of Episode 9, you could have ended the season there and left us hanging.

Kerry Ehrin: I never thought of it as an end. One of the really interesting things about this job is seeing how other people interpret it, react to it, and react to it emotionally. It’s really interesting to me, and it’s cool, but I always felt like we needed a landing place for Alex emotionally, for Bradley. I’m not really a cliffhanger writer. I do them to a certain extent because they are awesome, they have a purpose, but I feel really good emotionally about what I do, when I need to do it. I need to land a bit.

One of the main themes of this season was to cancel the culture and analyze it. What did you think of the crop cancellation when Mitch and Alex dissected it. How do you get society as a whole to forgive someone?

Ehrin: I don’t think it’s such a harsh thesis. It’s just looking inside various aspects, and really raising questions, different points of view because everything is so complicated, and I think sometimes – and I’m not talking about canceling the culture, I’m talking about problems in general – we tend to put them in a box and say ‘this is what it is’, and I feel like as humans we are very complicated and messy creatures with so many conflicting impulses for self-preservation, for wanting to be a good moral person, for wanting to be successful in the world. All of these things are all at play with everyone all the time, and I was really more interested in looking at that aspect than making some sort of definitive statement about culture.

Laura talks about her lifestyle exposed and then rejected by news industry players, similar to, but not exactly what happens with the backlash Alex is facing with the media. Can you explain this?

Ehrin: You can assimilate them by saying that it has to do with rejection, your rejection by society.

Apple TV +

What I’m thinking is – I believe avoidance is considered one of the most psychologically abusive forms of punishment. People need to feel in community and to be present in a community for their mental and emotional health. So, it’s interesting from that point of view, although I think it’s very different. These are quite different circumstances, one being that Laura didn’t do anything wrong, and Mitch did a lot of wrong, you know?

Mitch’s story isn’t, it’s really not about canceling, you know, ‘boo-hoo’ canceling culture, poor Mitch, in any way. His story was about Mitch the human who had lived his life in a state of denial, who believed he was a good guy, who lived in a bubble that was supported by all the people who worked around him, and when that bubble burst and when he had to look at who the world thought he was now he had to reconcile that inside himself, and his story is really about his internal journey through the rest of his life. as that person he doesn’t want to be and ultimately having to acknowledge that he was responsible for those actions. Whether or not he thought at the time, “Oh, I’m going to use my power to put this girl to bed,” he wasn’t. He was in denial. He thought he was like the most attractive man in the world because he had bought into his own PR and women liked him. He wasn’t looking at it from an honest place, and I think once he looks at it from an honest place, it’s not easy going. And that kind of leaves him painted in a corner because he doesn’t want to accept that this is who he is, and yet he slowly realizes that he is who he is.

In this season’s timeline, you’ve brought the events up to mid-March. How far do you plan to go in season 3? Are you going to accompany us to the Capitol riots? Or will there be a huge leap in time?

Ehrin: I don’t know at this point. My instinct is that there will be a jump in time.

As for the pendants for you, what do you want to see in season 3? What are you curious about?

Ehrin: Well I really want to see more of Bradley and Laura. I feel like Alex has come to a place for the first time since the pilot to accept who she is and face her worst fears, and I want to see how the phoenix rises from its ashes for her, and learn to have a full life and be present and loving. I know these don’t sound like big, eye-catching plot points, but that’s how I start a story: I start from what I see inside the character and what I want to experience next. with them, and I feel like Alex deserves it that much. I am curious to know where the fate of UBA is going. I love the Cory-Stella relationship. I think they’re a great story about kind of a transition from the old world to the new world, and I think they’re both such such rich characters, and I’m excited to see how they develop.

Valeria Golina as Paola and Billy Crudup as Cory.

The images of Mitch by Paola – do you think they’ll ever come back?

Ehrin: I think it might.

Talk about Alex’s bow. At the end of the first season, she was breaking news about Mitch and the network, and here she signs off with “Stay safe, stay sane, I’ll see you later.”

Kerry Ehrin: It starts in the pilot. She was a woman who didn’t pay attention to her own emotional life because of her career, and she put it all into her career. You know, her marriage wasn’t good. She wasn’t really happy. She was happy, she was so busy that she didn’t think about it. She has this very successful partnership with this person who then basically falls to the ground and does these horrible things and then it really causes a crack in her foundation that sends her down a path of self-assessment. It’s kind of a back and forth between denial and self-assessment and the truths that continue to bubble up, and when she airs at the end of the season, it wasn’t like if it was a conscious decision. It wasn’t like she sat down and said, I decided it was the right thing to do and I’m going to talk about it on the air. It was very emotional and impulsive, almost a breakdown as she accepted some of these truths that she didn’t want to look at, and because it was really kind of a vomit of her truths. It was such an emotional explosion for her; his character so prudent and guarded.

It was difficult for her to wake up the next day and be comfortable with it. And that’s why she left the show. I think she felt like there were so many things she couldn’t put in a box that made sense to her, so she just ran away. I think she ultimately really failed to work, and then her arc this season is about someone who wants to be vital again, but has these ghosts haunting her because now, having kind of had this emotional, impulsive depression where she told these truths, the audience made her a hero. Her whole thing this year is like, ‘I’m not a hero,’ that’s her on the inside. She can’t afford to run with it because she doesn’t believe she’s a hero. A lot of things are coming out this season about his past that weren’t intentionally bad, but as of yet was thoughtless. It was something that came out of his mouth. It was she who was trying to handle a situation. I think she’s really haunted by these ghosts, and Alex is a person who, she won’t stay in denial. She will stay tough. She doesn’t want to think about it. She gets cranky. She gets pissed off. But when she lets him in, he really sweeps her like a tidal wave.

And for me that’s what it’s all about 10, it’s just that person who’s been through so much emotionally and internally and got to a point where they’ve washed up on the beach and don’t than get up. For me, that’s where we end, and I’m really, really proud of it.

Outside from The Morning Show, As part of your Apple contract, is there anything else waiting for you?

Ehrin: I’m circling a few things right now that I’m very excited about, but they’re not official yet, so I can’t talk about them. But yeah, I really want to do more development. Obviously, doing a season of the show, which is already a complicated show, doing it during a pandemic, that was something.


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Reynolds Middle School switches to distance education for two weeks | Local News https://moorplasticsurgery.com/reynolds-middle-school-switches-to-distance-education-for-two-weeks-local-news/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 18:37:25 +0000 https://moorplasticsurgery.com/reynolds-middle-school-switches-to-distance-education-for-two-weeks-local-news/ The Reynolds School District announced Tuesday afternoon that Reynolds Middle School will temporarily switch to short-term distance learning for two weeks. FAIRVIEW, Ore. (KPTV) – The Reynolds School District announced Tuesday afternoon that Reynolds Middle School will temporarily switch to short-term distance learning for two weeks. The decision was made by the school district due […]]]>

The Reynolds School District announced Tuesday afternoon that Reynolds Middle School will temporarily switch to short-term distance learning for two weeks.



FAIRVIEW, Ore. (KPTV) – The Reynolds School District announced Tuesday afternoon that Reynolds Middle School will temporarily switch to short-term distance learning for two weeks.

The decision was made by the school district due to changes in learning methods and isolation caused by COVID-19 closures and quarantines. Superintendent Danna Diaz wrote that the conditions negatively impacted the well-being of students and staff.

Diaz also said in the announcement that “some students struggle with the socialization skills necessary for in-person learning, which disrupts school for other students.”






KPTV Image


Officials say there have been student explosions in several classrooms, which in some cases have led to fights. Officials also said some teachers were not equipped to deal with these issues on their own.

Steve Padilla, deputy director of public relations for the school district, says the impacts of the pandemic have also exhausted teachers.

“Then they come back and not only teach, but have to look at the protocols, make sure the students are wearing their masks,” Padilla said. “It has an effect, not only on our students but also on our teachers.”

To ease the transition, there will be no school for students at Reynolds Middle School on Thursday and Friday. Short-term distance learning will begin on November 22. Students will begin the transition to in-person learning starting December 7.

Student devices and teaching materials will be sent home with students on Tuesday November 16 and Wednesday November 17.

Meals (breakfast and lunch) can be picked up curbside each day (except November 25-26) outside Reynolds Middle School from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

FOX 12 asked Padilla what will happen over the next two weeks to ensure a safe learning environment for students. He says they use a number of resources to help them improve students’ social and emotional health.

“We are waiting for TASAS – Teachers on Special Assignment – to come in to help. We are working with advisors to see how we can provide more services to students and teachers, and see if we can have more staff available in the hallways, in the classrooms, ”he said.

Padilla says the district heard from parents who are not in favor of the decision and asked why students who disrupted classrooms weren’t individually punished. He says it’s because these disruptions can have a domino effect on the well-being of other students in the class.

“We want to make sure that what we’re doing is for the entire Reynolds School District community,” Padilla said. “We ask everyone for patience.”

Padilla did not know the nature of the fights in the classrooms, whether physical or verbal, or how many students were involved. He said it would be up to the principal to decide if there would be any consequences for these students.

The school district has a board meeting Wednesday night. Board members will get the change to influence how the college is expected to move forward over the two week period.

The Reynolds School District announced Tuesday afternoon that Reynolds Middle School will temporarily switch to short-term distance learning for two weeks.



Copyright 2021 KPTV-KPDX Broadcasting Corporation. All rights reserved.


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CommonWealth Magazine https://moorplasticsurgery.com/commonwealth-magazine/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 03:01:53 +0000 https://moorplasticsurgery.com/commonwealth-magazine/ AFTER A YEAR AND A HALF From an unprecedented disruption to daily life, parents of Kindergarten to Grade 12 students in Massachusetts are very optimistic about what returning to in-person classes will bring, with more than a third saying they expect their child to complete the current school year before class. level. That’s one of […]]]>

AFTER A YEAR AND A HALF From an unprecedented disruption to daily life, parents of Kindergarten to Grade 12 students in Massachusetts are very optimistic about what returning to in-person classes will bring, with more than a third saying they expect their child to complete the current school year before class. level.

That’s one of the notable findings of a new poll, which also found that nearly three-quarters of Massachusetts parents believe going back to school has had a positive impact on the child. The positive results were tempered by many parents saying that their child’s school lacks academic support resources or that they do not know if such supports exist.

The results come from a survey of 1,479 parents of Massachusetts K-12 students conducted by the MassINC Polling Group from October 18 to November 2. The survey was sponsored by the Barr Foundation with a major contribution from the Education Trust.

The poll, the fifth in a series of education surveys conducted by MassINC Polling Group since the start of the pandemic, reveals a surprisingly positive outlook among parents, despite the steady pace of warnings about loss of learning and the mental and emotional toll of the COVID disruption. on young people.

While 20 percent of parents believe their child is currently above grade level, 35 percent believe their child will be ahead of their academic benchmarks by the end of the school year in June. That figure is even higher than the 28% of parents who said their child was above grade before the pandemic hit.

“Parents’ expectations for this year are very high,” said Maeve Duggan, research director at MassINC Polling Group. “It is a wish, an expectation or a remarkable hope on the part of parents as to how much land their child will regain this year. “

More than half of parents (54%) said going back to school had a major positive impact on their child and 19% said it had a minor positive impact.

Among parents who believe their child is currently behind on grade, 62 percent believe they will be at or above grade level by the end of the year.

While parents seem to associate the return to in-person schooling with expectations of significant learning gains, survey results suggest that they view the benefits of reopening schools much more broadly than simply providing a better environment for them to learn. academic learning. Of the 73 percent of parents who said returning to school had a positive impact on their child, the possibility of social interaction with others was the most frequently cited reason for this impact, with 52 percent identifying socialization with teachers and peers as the main positive factor. It was followed by 18% who said the positive impact came most from a more supportive learning environment that included more practical help from teachers.

While the survey reveals largely positive opinions of parents about reopening schools, more than a third of parents say their child’s school does not have additional academic support, such as one-on-one tutoring or small group learning. – or they don’t know if they are available. Meanwhile, only about a third of parents report having received the results of diagnostic tests assessing their child’s academic performance, with most parents relying on a teacher’s notes or conversations or notes for this information.

“There is a bit of a mismatch between parents’ expectations and what they want to happen this year and what is actually happening,” Duggan said.

There were differences between types of schools in parents’ perceptions of resource availability, with parents of children in district public schools less likely to say things like smaller classes or one-to-one lessons. were available as parents of children in charter, private, or Catholic schools.

Parents who believe their child is behind on grade were also less likely to say these academic supports were available, suggesting that students who might need these resources the most may be the least likely to receive them. .

Concerns about their child’s mental and emotional health remain high among parents, but have declined from earlier points in the pandemic. Compared to the results of the parent survey in February, the share of parents who say they give equal weight to academic and mental health problems has remained stable (42% in February and 46% now). But among parents who said one of the two areas was more of a concern, the proportion saying academic concerns were a priority rose from 19% to 33%, while those citing mental health issues rose from 34%. at 16%.

Most parents had little knowledge of what plans their child’s school might have for using federal funding from the American Rescue Plan Act. When asked how they thought the money should be spent, more than half of parents said tutoring or other additional academic supports should be the priority.

Among parents with vaccine-eligible children, about three-quarters have had at least one child vaccinated, and more than half say all of their eligible children have received the COVID vaccine.

The survey ended when children aged 5 to 11 could be vaccinated. When asked if they intended to immunize currently ineligible children once they were eligible, 65% of parents said yes.

There were clear demographic and geographic differences. Asian parents were the most likely to say they would get their children vaccinated (79%), while black parents were the least likely (51%). Latino (68%) and White (64%) parents fell in between.

Meet the author

Editor-in-chief, Commonwealth

On Michael jonas

Michael Jonas has worked in Massachusetts journalism since the early 1980s. Prior to joining the CommonWealth team in early 2001, he was an editor for the magazine for two years. His cover story in the Fall 1999 issue of CommonWealth on Young Boston Outreach Workers was shortlisted for a PASS (Prevention for a Safer Society) award from the National Crime and Delinquency Council.

Michael made his journalism debut at Dorchester Community News, a community newspaper serving Boston’s largest neighborhood, where he covered a range of urban issues. Since the late 1980s, he has been a regular contributor to the Boston Globe. For 15 years he wrote a weekly column on local politics for the City Weekly section of the Boston Sunday Globe.

Michael has also worked in broadcast journalism. In 1989 he was co-producer of “The AIDS Quarterly”, a national PBS series produced by WGBH-TV in Boston, and in the early 1990s he worked as a producer for “Our Times”, a weekly magazine on WHDH- TV (Ch. 7) in Boston.

Michael lives in Dorchester with his wife and their two daughters.

On Michael jonas

Michael Jonas has worked in Massachusetts journalism since the early 1980s. Prior to joining the CommonWealth team in early 2001, he was an editor for the magazine for two years. His cover story in the Fall 1999 issue of CommonWealth on Young Boston Outreach Workers was shortlisted for a PASS (Prevention for a Safer Society) award from the National Crime and Delinquency Council.

Michael made his journalism debut at Dorchester Community News, a community newspaper serving Boston’s largest neighborhood, where he covered a range of urban issues. Since the late 1980s, he has been a regular contributor to the Boston Globe. For 15 years he wrote a weekly column on local politics for the City Weekly section of the Boston Sunday Globe.

Michael has also worked in broadcast journalism. In 1989 he was co-producer of “The AIDS Quarterly”, a national PBS series produced by WGBH-TV in Boston, and in the early 1990s he worked as a producer for “Our Times”, a weekly magazine on WHDH- TV (Ch. 7) in Boston.

Michael lives in Dorchester with his wife and their two daughters.

Childhood immunization responsiveness was strongly related to parental education level, with 55% of those with a high school diploma or less stating that they would vaccinate their children compared to 81% of those with a higher education diploma. Broken down by region, 80% of parents in Boston and its inner suburbs said they would vaccinate their children once they were eligible, compared to 64% of parents in suburban Boston, 63% of those in central and central Boston. western Massachusetts and only 44. percent of those in the southeast by mass.

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Tips to help registrants manage the psychological impact of Covid-19 when writing their exams https://moorplasticsurgery.com/tips-to-help-registrants-manage-the-psychological-impact-of-covid-19-when-writing-their-exams/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 05:28:59 +0000 https://moorplasticsurgery.com/tips-to-help-registrants-manage-the-psychological-impact-of-covid-19-when-writing-their-exams/ “It is important to recognize the psychological impact of Covid-19 on learners.” Photo: Getty Images The Matrix Class of 2021 is still persevering for its last challenge – its final exams. The past year has been extraordinarily difficult, especially for learners struggling to pass their exams despite the Covid-19 pandemic and other disruptions that have […]]]>

“It is important to recognize the psychological impact of Covid-19 on learners.” Photo: Getty Images

The Matrix Class of 2021 is still persevering for its last challenge – its final exams.

The past year has been extraordinarily difficult, especially for learners struggling to pass their exams despite the Covid-19 pandemic and other disruptions that have occurred this year.

However, to be fully prepared for these exams, learners may need to be healthy and mentally prepared for them.

Parent24 spoke with Rebecca Pretorius, Country Manager for South Africa at Crimson Education, about how students can balance their exams and their health during the pandemic.

Pretorius said: “It is important to recognize the psychological impact of Covid-19. The most common changes in how students may feel about before the pandemic could be lack of motivation, anxiety, stress and isolation. “

“For this reason, it is important to take care of your physical and mental health to help you get through what is, even outside of a pandemic, a stressful time for a student, and also to help you fight Covid-19. if you get it, “added Pretorius.

Read: A high-level guide to survival exams, diet productivity tips and more

She says it all starts with eating healthy because it will help you function properly.

Second, Pretorius suggests that learners schedule free time and fill it with exercises and activities to restore them.

“Since most of your time will be spent at your desk and in front of your books, you want to make sure that that time is well spent and efficient and that it doesn’t drain your mental and emotional health,” Pretorius adds.

Below, she has included some practical ways to help learners overcome exam stress and stay mentally and physically healthy.

Hack yourself

Pretorius says knowing your routine and creating habits that will keep you going is essential.

She adds that this can include effectively managing your time by scheduling your free time, as this will keep you productive and healthy.

Study right

She says effective note-taking is essential when studying exams, such as using titles, underlying keywords, or numbering your work to organize.

Students should use their calendars to organize and prioritize their free time activities to ensure that they have enough time for their study load.

“The exams are predictable. Use study guides for practice. Use the curriculum or your textbooks to base your study,” says Pretorius.

Review strategies

She says students need to be familiar with exams – exam structures, types of exam questions, and she says the ideal way of formulating answers doesn’t change.

Here are some tips for taking practice exams / old homework:

1. Start with an open book and check the answers as you go before you get closer and closer to replicating the exam conditions.

2. Mistakes are great because they identify your weak spots that you can focus on.

3. Be sure to complete several past exam papers.

4. If you make a mistake, make sure you find the correct answer or ask your teacher.

5. Make sure you take the same number of practice exams for all of your subjects so that you have the same knowledge and don’t sacrifice any subject.

6. Go through the memos after trying the exams. Write down the tough questions and read the answers.

Read also : Why students don’t attend classes: what we found at a South African university

Tips for an effective recall

Pretorius says there is always an addiction to recovery or reminders to show understanding, so you need to study in a way that effectively helps you memorize content, emphasizing that reading notes won’t help you, but active reading will.

Maintain relationships

She says, “While you may need some time alone to focus on your studies, don’t isolate yourself. “

“Stick to your routine as much as possible to eat with your family, participate in your stimulating activities, and talk about what you’re struggling with or what’s going on well,” Pretorius explained.

Find more free exam resources here.

Discussion:

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Patients can get COVID from workers, dark chapters in America’s past https://moorplasticsurgery.com/patients-can-get-covid-from-workers-dark-chapters-in-americas-past/ Wed, 10 Nov 2021 11:14:07 +0000 https://moorplasticsurgery.com/patients-can-get-covid-from-workers-dark-chapters-in-americas-past/ Healthcare workers can infect patients As for the federal rules released last week requiring COVID-19 vaccinations for healthcare workers, what took so long? I recently spent two nights in a crowded emergency room, where I was admitted for a heart attack. I was lucky enough to have a room. Other patients were lying in the […]]]>

Healthcare workers can infect patients

As for the federal rules released last week requiring COVID-19 vaccinations for healthcare workers, what took so long?

I recently spent two nights in a crowded emergency room, where I was admitted for a heart attack. I was lucky enough to have a room. Other patients were lying in the hallways.

I had a fantastic nurse who looked after me very well and with whom I bonded. On the second day, while preparing for my procedure, I discovered that this nurse was not vaccinated.

Following:How to send a letter to the editor

After my procedure, I was given a room and had another very caring nurse, who I discovered was also not vaccinated.

When I got home, I called the hospital and asked to speak to someone from the administration. When I asked why these workers were not vaccinated, I was told it was “a matter of personal choice”.


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“Pete the Therapy Dog” presented to elementary school students in Springfield – WHIO TV 7 and WHIO Radio https://moorplasticsurgery.com/pete-the-therapy-dog-presented-to-elementary-school-students-in-springfield-whio-tv-7-and-whio-radio/ Mon, 08 Nov 2021 20:59:33 +0000 https://moorplasticsurgery.com/pete-the-therapy-dog-presented-to-elementary-school-students-in-springfield-whio-tv-7-and-whio-radio/ SPRINGFIELD – Students at a Springfield elementary school now have a new furry friend who walks the halls every week. >>Governor signs new Ohio fireworks law Students at Horace Mann Elementary School recently met Pete, a 2-year-old, 110-pound yellow Labrador retriever and certified therapy dog, a district spokesperson said in a press release on Monday. […]]]>

SPRINGFIELD – Students at a Springfield elementary school now have a new furry friend who walks the halls every week.

>>Governor signs new Ohio fireworks law

Students at Horace Mann Elementary School recently met Pete, a 2-year-old, 110-pound yellow Labrador retriever and certified therapy dog, a district spokesperson said in a press release on Monday.

Pete, whose owners are Kevin Schalnat, principal of Horace Mann and his wife Sarah, was recently certified as a therapy dog ​​after starting training at just 6 months old, the spokesperson said.

“Pete, Principal Schalnat and his wife Sarah have gone through intensive training to make sure Pete is ready to be a part of the building and neighborhood community,” the spokesperson said.

“He and Principal Schalnat have taken several courses in obedience, self-awareness and even tricks! Pete can shake hands, say hello, and complete over a dozen additional tasks on command.

Schalnat plans Pete to make weekly visits to Horace Mann, but Pete will be available to go anywhere he needs to in the school district, the spokesperson said.

Schalnat also plans to take Pete on patient visits at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus and Children’s Hospital in Dayton.

“According to a National Institutes of Health study, the use of therapy dogs in schools provides benefits for the physical and emotional health of students, promoting a positive mood and decreasing stress. Therapy dogs have also been shown to build a child’s confidence and empathy, ”the district spokesperson said.

In times of crisis and tragedy, the district had called in a team of therapy dogs from outside organizations to help the students. Now the district will have Pete on weekly visits and plans to add a second therapy dog.

Gunner, who is owned by an occupational therapist in the district, is currently undergoing training to become the next therapy dog ​​in the district after receiving his certification, the spokesperson said.


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