SWAB’s ‘Love Your Body Week’ teaches students about self-care

SWAB members give students sunflowers with words of affirmation on them. Healthy Minds freshman ambassador Lydia Smith said the goal of ‘Love Your Body Week’ is to promote overall wellbeing. Photo by Sammie Wuensche

Nourishing the body with proper foods, exercise, positive self-talk, and healthy relationships are all practices the Student Wellness Advisory Council hopes students use to take care of themselves, said Mallory Finley, SWAB Healthy Communities Junior Ambassador. Amid the stresses of everyday life, Finley said it’s easy to forget about your own needs.

SWAB held “Love Your Body Week” from February 1st. 14-17 to promote self-love. During the early years of adulthood, building healthy habits is key to continuing throughout life, and SWAB helps facilitate that, Finley said.

“Self-care is such a crucial thing – especially in college, when you’re learning to be independent and living on your own and seeing what it’s like in your own life for the first time for a lot of people, Finley said, “I just think being able to promote things like rest and self-care is our biggest takeaway.”

Events of the week

Each event throughout the week merged the missions of SWAB’s three branches — Healthy Minds, Healthy Bodies and Healthy Communities, said Healthy Minds Freshman Ambassador Lydia Smith.

Junior Emma Rydholm holds her sunflower with a nice note on it from SWAB.  Mallory Finley, ambassador for Junior Healthy Communities, said she saw
Junior Emma Rydholm holds her sunflower with a nice note on it from SWAB. Junior Healthy Communities Ambassador Mallory Finley said seeing ‘Love Your Body Week’ bring joy to students was rewarding. Photo by Sammie Wuensche Photo credit: Sammie Wuensche

The week kicked off on February 14 with a Valentine’s Day-themed event where SWAB Ambassadors distributed flowers with positive sayings attached to stems on the main campus. Smith said she saw how little things can put a smile on students’ faces at the event.

“It was super cute because I saw people all day walking around and still holding their flowers with the little affirmations on them,” Smith said. “I love getting flowers, so it was just cute to see everyone really happy.”

The Feb. 15 event focused on promoting a healthy mindset with food. In the early afternoon, SWAB Ambassadors gathered in Mullin Town Square for an eating disorder screening – a type of survey intended to provide insight into a student’s relationship with food – where students were received Pressed Juicery wellness photos for their participation.

SWAB offers Pressed Juicery Wellness Plans for students taking the Eating Disorders Screening Test.  Eating Disorder Therapist Nicole D'Aoust said she appreciates SWAB educating students about different types of eating challenges.  Photo by Lucian Himes
SWAB offers Pressed Juicery Wellness Plans for students taking the Eating Disorders Screening Test. Eating Disorder Therapist Nicole D’Aoust said she appreciates SWAB educating students about different types of eating challenges. Photo by Lucian Himes

Later that evening, Nicole D’Aoust, a graduate student at Pepperdine’s Graduate School of Education and Psychology and an eating disorder therapist, presented at the workshop on Intuitive Eating and PCB disorder. D’Aoust said many people, especially young students, don’t know the true definitions of an eating disorder and an eating disorder.

“We basically covered the difference between eating disorders and eating disorders, and I touched on a bit of myths and misconceptions about eating disorders,” D’Aoust said. “Then I gave a brief overview of the ‘health at every height model,’ which is a model including weight and height that we try to use to treat everyone, not just those with health disorders. food.”

Graphic courtesy of Nicole D'Aoust
Graphic courtesy of Nicole D’Aoust

D’Aoust said that with about 25 students in attendance, she wanted to educate students about healthy food relationships and also offer resources. At the end of his presentation, D’Aoust gave attendees hotline numbers and suggested podcasts, books and websites to help inform and heal from food-related challenges.

D’Aoust said many people are unaware they have an unhealthy relationship with food in the first place.

“There’s such a misconception that ‘taking care of my body equals losing weight or restricting food or exercising,'” D’Aoust said. – we associate with health, when in reality it is more detrimental and does not like your body. It’s treating your body in a way that shows you don’t like the way it is now.

The closing event was Healthy Happy Hour on the afternoon of February 17 in the town square in Lower Mullin.

Smith said SWAB has partnered with Resilience-Informed Skills Education, Campus Recreation, Inter-Club Council, Student Government Association, The Board and TriDelta to promote different avenues of physical health. Each organization had a table on the main campus.

“It was just to celebrate the body you are in and provide different resources in an informative setting within different clubs,” Finley said. “For us [SWAB Healthy Communities branch], we organized a “Coffee and Consent” booth to talk about the importance of consent in relationships. The various stands spoke from their own viewpoints on topics. »

SGA Class sophomore Senator Sabrina Musharbash said she filed at the event in favor of girls-only gym hours. This, she said, would improve both physical and mental health, creating a more comfortable environment for women to exercise.

“Our table was just getting input from our class on what their opinions would be on girls-only hours in the gym and cage expansion,” Musharbash said.

goal of the week

Being part of the planning for “Love Your Body Week” and seeing the positive impact it had on students was meaningful to Smith, she said. His goal in joining SWAB was to engage in an organization that would impact others.

“It’s so important to talk about this stuff and have programs on campus for mental health,” Smith said. “Because I know from my own experience that I didn’t have the resources that I wish I had when I was struggling a lot, and so I think being able to provide that to people is super cool.”

Students complete the Eating Disorder Screening Questionnaire at the SWAB table on Lower Adamson Plaza.  Junior Healthy Communities Ambassador Mallory Finley said it was important for students to be aware of their healthy habits.  Photo by Lucian Himes
Students complete the Eating Disorder Screening Questionnaire at the SWAB table on Lower Adamson Plaza. Junior Healthy Communities Ambassador Mallory Finley said it was important for students to be aware of their healthy habits. Photo by Lucian Himes

Upon learning about “Love Your Body Week,” D’Aoust said she was pleasantly surprised at how many health areas SWAB covered.

SWAB’s themed weeks and events to encourage self-care and love are important all the time, not just after Valentine’s Day, Finley said.

“I always thought that was really cool and it’s really important that our school has a resource and a community of students who promote these things not within the administration and faculty,” Finley said.

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Email Liza Esquibias: [email protected]

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